Response of an Indian community to a suicide epidemic, a follow-up report
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Response of an Indian community to a suicide epidemic, a follow-up report full report by John A. Ward

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Published by Sudbury Algoma Sanatorium in Sudbury, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Ontario -- Manitoulin Island,
  • Indians of North America -- Suicidal behaviour

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby J. A. Ward
ContributionsInternational Congress for Suicide Prevention and Crisis Intervention (10th : 1979 : Ottawa, Canada)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE"98"S9"W373
The Physical Object
Pagination27, [18] leaves
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21600721M

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In responding to suicide-related events, the federal facility or tribal Indian health program may: Provide a verbal response to all emergent requests for assistance from the federal facility or tribe within one business day upon receipt of the request. A written response shall follow within three days of . Suicide continues to be an epidemic in Indian Country, especially among young American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals. In Indian Country, suicide must be seen within the context of how historical and ongoing present-day trauma has impacted Native communities. The disparities in health, education, and employment opportunities, coupled with the high prevalence of violence and Cited by: 6. A Suicide Epidemic in an American Indian Community. Tower, Margene. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, v3 n1 p Sum Examines the suicide epidemic on Wind River Reservation during August and September , which produced 12 suicide deaths and 88 verifiable attempts or threats, mainly among teenagers and young Cited by: A review of suicide in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities found that successful suicide prevention programs used in these communities generally (1) address risk factors while “building individual self-efficacy and positive self-image,” (2) “are strength-based and culturally sensitive,” and (3) include traditional healing practices as well as cultural/spiritual.

  New Delhi: Suicide is a global phenomenon and shockingly accounts for % of deaths India, student suicide has assumed epidemic proportion with one student committing suicide every 55 minutes in the country. In one week, two students of the country's premier institutes committed suicide - one by hanging herself to death and the other jumped from the fifth floor of the . Examples of barriers to help-seeking are a desire to be self-reliant and the perception of mental health services as “an external agent that is not part of tribal community.” This summary is from: Gray, J. S. & McCullagh, J.A. (). Suicide in Indian Country: The continuing epidemic in . Suicide disproportionately affects American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). The suicide rate among AI/AN has been increasing since (1), and in , AI/AN suicide rates in the 18 states participating in the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) were per ,, more than times higher than those among racial/ethnic groups with the lowest rates.*.   In recent weeks suicide has been written about extensively in the United States, with high profile individuals giving a renewed focus to the tragic loss of life. But new data shows suicide is a.

  Suicide is a leading cause of death in the U.S. and suicide rates have increased more than 30 percent since Among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI and AN) communities, suicide rates are even higher than among the general population, and they are highest among youth and young adults, ages 15– Suicide continues to be an epidemic in Indian Country, especially among young American Indians and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals. In Indian Country, suicide must be seen within the context of.   A youth-suicide epidemic is sweeping Indian country, with Native American teens and young adults killing themselves at more than triple the rate of other young Americans, according to federal government figures. In pockets of the United States, suicide among Native American youth is 9 to 19 times as frequent as among other youths, and rising. This report gives an overview of suicide prevention strategies used in Alaska. It provides background information on the suicide epidemic within the state, and explores the effectiveness of recent suicide prevention efforts. It also highlights data on suicide rates among American Indians and Alaskan Natives.