Biology of the seed-corn maggot in the coastal plain of the South Atlantic States
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Biology of the seed-corn maggot in the coastal plain of the South Atlantic States by W. J. Reid

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Vegetables -- Diseases and pests -- South Atlantic States,
  • Maggots,
  • Plants, Edible -- Diseases and pests -- South Atlantic States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesSeed-corn maggot.
Statementby W. J. Reid, Jr.
SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 723, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 723.
ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Agriculture.
The Physical Object
Pagination44 p. :
Number of Pages44
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23048223M
OCLC/WorldCa9692613

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BIOLOGY OF THE SEED-CORN MAGGOT IN THE COASTAL PLAIN OF THE SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES [ Reid] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Reid. Get this from a library! Biology of the seed-corn maggot in the coastal plain of the south Atlantic states. [W J Reid; United States. Department of Agriculture.]. The seed-corn maggot, Hylemya cilicrura (Rond.), infests a wide range of hosts in all provinces of Canada and is also a pest in the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. H. liturata (Meig.) frequently occurs in smaller numbers along with H. cilicrura. H. liturata has not,been recorded from Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba (Brooks, ). Detailed accounts of the species have not been.   Biology of the seed-corn maggot in the coastal plain of the south Atlantic States. USDA Tech. Bull. no. Roessingh, P. and Städler, E. Foliar form, colour and surface characteristics influence oviposition behaviour in the cabbage root fly, Delia radicum. Entomol. Exp.

EffeclS of 19 antagonistic organisms on seed- corn maggot oviposition u Treatment n i eggs (SEM) Biology of the seed-corn maggot in. the coastal plain of the South Atlantic states. Biology of the seed-corn mag-got in the coastal plain of the south Atlantic states. U.S. Dep. Agric. Tech. Bull. Adults of the seed-corn maggot, Hylemyia cilicrura (Rond.), are able. Other articles where Seedcorn maggot is discussed: anthomyiid fly: The seedcorn maggot (D. platura) feeds on the seeds and seedlings of a variety of crops, including corn (maize), peas, and different types of beans. Damaged seeds either develop into weak plants or fail to sprout. This species has a short life cycle and produces three. The seedcorn maggot is found throughout North Carolina. Seedcorn maggots feed primarily on decaying organic matter, but sometimes infest the seeds and seedlings of vegetables. The dead, fungus-infected flies are sometimes abundant on the dead twigs of dogwood and crape myrtle in the spring.

  Seedcorn maggot is a seed and seedling pest of corn and soybean. Plant injury is especially prevalent during cool and wet springs. The larvae, or maggots, feed on germinating corn and soybean seeds or seedlings (Photo 1). They can feed on the embryo, delay development or kill the plant. Infestations tend to be field-wide instead of grouped together like for many other pests. Advanced. Scientific Name Delia platura. Identification The translucent white maggots are small (seedcorn maggot is a small (5 mm, ¼ in.) grey-black fly. These small white maggots feed on the swollen, ungerminated seed of vegetable crops. Poor stand establishment is often a symptom of infestation. Delia platura. Pest description and crop damage A small white maggot that attacks seed, germinating seeds, and seedlings. Seedlings that germinate usually die before maturation or are severely stunted. Seedcorn maggot-induced damage is facilitated by early . Biology. Seedcorn maggots overwinter in Iowa as a pupa in the soil. Adult flies emerge and mate in April and May, and females lay eggs in soil. Maggot densities will be higher in soils with high organic matter. Land that is heavily manured may be especially attractive to early-laying females.